For Ammonis, Who Died at 29, in 610 The Canon
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Raphael, they’re asking you to write a few lines
as an epitaph for the poet Ammonis:
something very tasteful and polished. You can do it,
you’re the one to write something suitable
for the poet Ammonis, our Ammonis.
 
Of course you’ll speak about his poems—
but say something too about his beauty,
about his subtle beauty that we loved.
 
Your Greek is always elegant and musical.
But we want all your craftsmanship now.
Our sorrow and our love move into a foreign language.
Pour your Egyptian feeling into the Greek you use.
 
Raphael, your verses, you know, should be written
so they contain something of our life within them,
so the rhythm, so every phrase clearly shows
than an Alexandrian is writing about an Alexandrian.

Translated by Edmund Keeley/Philip Sherrard

(C.P. Cavafy, Collected Poems. Translated by Edmund Keeley and Philip Sherrard. Edited by George Savidis. Revised Edition. Princeton University Press, 1992)

- Original Greek Poem

- Translation by George Valassopoulo